RECOMMENDATIONS

 

"A valuable resource"

The reports of Bernreuter Research are a valuable resource for solid insight to the rapidly evolving photovoltaic industry. The well-researched content provides an easy to digest forward view of upcoming market and technology trends.                                                             Charlie Gay

Charlie Gay is director of the Solar Energy Technologies Office (now known as SunShot Initiative) at the  U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. and co-founder of the Greenstar Foundation.

Gay has nearly 40 years of experience in the photovoltaic industry. He served in leading positions at:

Charlie Gay



"Diligent analysis"

Johannes Bernreuter is a higly qualified journalist in the photovoltaic space whose carefully researched and clearly written reports on market, industry and research I have learnt to appreciate since quite some time. Specifically, his diligent analysis of new developments in the area of  silicon feedstock material provides well-founded insight for specialists in the PV field as well as non-experts.        Eicke Weber                                                                                              

Eicke Weber

Eicke Weber was director of the renowned Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE) in Freiburg (Germany) and incumbent of the Chair for Applied Physics, Solar Energy, at the University of Freiburg from July 2006 through December 2016. In January 2017 he was appointed director and chief executive officer of the Berkeley Education Alliance for Research in Singapore (BEARS). Weber already taught at the Department of Material Science and Engineering of the University of California in Berkeley from 1983 to 2006.

The physicist is considered as one of the worldwide leading experts for the characterization of defects in silicon and so-called III-V semiconductors like gallium arsenide and gallium nitride. He has been working on a method of clustering metals contained in silicon by temperature treatment so that less pure and more inexpensive silicon ("dirty silicon") can be used as a feedstock for the production of solar cells.

Charlie Gay, a veteran in the solar industry, esteems the work of Bernreuter Research.